5241th Birth Anniversary of Lord Krishna

Posted: August 17, 2014 in Hare Krsnas, Hare Krsnas aren't Hindus, Janmaashtami, Krishna Janmashtami, Sri Krishna, Sri Krishna's Birthdate
Krishna Birth – 18th July 3228 BCE

Krishna Death – 18th February 3102 BCE (the start of Kali Yuga)

According to above time lines Lord Krishna lived for 126 years and 5 months. If we had Gregorian calendar at the time of Lord Krishna’s birth it would had been 23rd June -3227 on Gregorian calendar. Panchang data show that on 18th July 3228 BCE during Nishita or Hindu midnight both Ashtami Tithi and Rohini Nakshatra were prevailing.

Fasting Rules on Krishna Janmashtami

Krishna Janmashtami is also known as Krishnashtami, Gokulashtami, Ashtami Rohini, Srikrishna Jayanti and Sree Jayanthi.

According to the scriptures, one should observe strict fast, i.e., without food and water on the day of one’s Ishta-Devata. However, if one is not able to observe it owing to medical conditions or other disabilities, then, one ought to follow the rules set for Ekadashi fasting: no grains should be consumed during Janmashtami. And according to Smartha Sampradaya, one breaks the fast the next day after Sunrise: when Ashtami Tithi and Rohini Nakshatra are over.

Most of the time, Krishna Janmashtami is listed on two consecutive days. The first one is for Smarta Sampradaya and other one is for Vaishanava Sampradaya. Vaishanava Sampradaya date is the latter one.

Many people will notice unanimity in North India on choosing the day to celebrate Krishna Janmashtami. The reason behind this unanimity is the institution of ISKCON. The International Society for Krishna Consciousness, commonly known as ISKCON is founded on the principles of Vaishnava traditions and most followers of the ISKCON are the followers of Vaishnavism.

ISKCON is one of the most commercialized and global religious institutions that spend money and resources to promote ISKCON brand and ISKCON culture. In North India, therefore, most people observe Janmashtami on the day chosen by ISKCON. Many people who are not the followers of Vaishnavism don’t even understand that ISKCON traditions are different and the most appropriate day to observe Janmashtami fasting might not be same as that of ISKCON.

Smarta followers who understand the difference between Smarta and Vaishnava sectarian don’t follow ISKCON date to observe Janmashtami fasting. Unfortunately ISKCON date to observe Janmashtami is unanimously followed in Braj region and most common people who just follow the buzz observe it on the date followed by the ISKCON.

People who are not the followers of Vaishnavism are followers of Smartism. Hindu religious texts like Dharmasindhu and Nirnaysindhu have well defined rules to decide Janmashtami day and those rules should be followed to decide Janmashtami day if one is not the follower of Vaishnava Sampradaya. Ekadashi fasting is one of the good examples to understand this difference. Rules to observe Ekadashis’ fasting are also different for Smarta and Vaishnava communities. However there is more awareness about different Ekadashi rules followed by Vaishnava sectarian. Not only Ekadashis, Vaishnava fasting day for Janmashtami and Rama Navami might be one day later than Smarta fasting day.

The followers of Vaishnavism give preference to Ashtami Tithi and Rohini Nakshatra. The followers of Vaishnavism never observe Janmashtami on Saptami Tithi. Janmashtami day according to Vaishnava rules always fall on Ashtami or Navami Tithi on Hindu calendar.

However rules followed by Smartism to decide Janmashtami day are more complex. The preference is given to Nishita or Hindu midnight. The preference is given to the day, either Saptami Tithi or Ashtami Tithi, when Ashtami Tithi prevails during Nishita and further rules are added to include Rohini Nakshatra. The final consideration is given to the day which has the most auspicious combination of Ashtami Tithi and Rohini Nakshatra during Nishita time. Janmashtami day according to Smarta rules always fall on Saptami or Ashtami Tithi on Hindu calendar. 

Source: Pundits at Dhrik Phanjng

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s